Acupuncture

Our vet Fiona Chapman treats animals with acupuncture at all three of our branches.

Any of our reception staff can assist you with making an appointment.

 

What is Acupuncture?

Acupuncture has been used for thousands of years to successfully treat both animals and humans. It is now being used by an increasing number of vets as a complementary or adjunctive therapy. Acupuncture is the stimulation of specific points on the body with thin, sterile, single-use needles to achieve the desired effect. It is a means of helping the body to heal itself.

 

How Does Acupuncture Work?

Acupuncture affects all the major physiological systems in the body, primarily working through the central nervous system (which controls the musculoskeletal, hormonal and cardiovascular systems).  Acupuncture is much more than just pain relief. Its exact action depends on the condition and which ‘acupoints’ are used.  Acupuncture increases circulation and causes a release of many transmitters and hormones in the nervous system (including endorphins). Acupuncture relieves muscle spasms, stimulates nerves and stimulates the body’s natural defence mechanisms.

 

Could Your Pet Benefit from Acupuncture?

Acupuncture is most commonly used to provide additional pain relief for animals with arthritis. In some cases, acupuncture can reduce the need for pain relief medication.  However, acupuncture can also be of benefit in a number of other conditions, including hip dysplasia, nerve or skin problems, and feline asthma.

 

Is Acupuncture Painful?

Acupuncture is very well tolerated; most animals relax once the needles are in place, and some even fall asleep. Some animals may experience a brief moment of sensitivity when a needle is first placed, but then quickly relax again.

 

Is Acupuncture Safe?

Acupuncture is very safe if performed by a competent acupuncturist.

 

What is the Treatment Protocol?

At Watkins & Tasker, we recommend a minimum of three sessions before assessing the response to treatment. If no positive effect is observed after three sessions treatment will be discontinued.  The initial session will be 45 minutes to allow full assessment of the patient as well as acupuncture treatment. Follow-up sessions will be 30 minutes.

 

Fiona has completed the ABVA (Association of British Veterinary Acupuncturists) Foundation Course in Veterinary Acupuncture.  If you have any questions, then please contact Fiona via any of our branches and she will be happy to discuss acupuncture with you.

 

 

To read more about the benefits of acupuncture read the case study of Dodger and his painful back.